Every Woman Should Listen To Janelle Monáe’s ‘Dirty Computer’ Like An Audio Bible.

Being from a hard-working family and a musically bland city, Janelle Monáe has always highlighted the under-appreciated and the outsider with her lyrics. What sets her apart is the willingness to speak and deliver multilayered analysis of complicated social issues. She isn’t just a feminist who gives powerful speeches, the topic is a resounding feature in her music. Since her mixtape days, she has, sonically, lyrically, and aesthetically articulated a vision for the liberation of women and black People.

On ‘Dirty Computer’ she tackles some interdisciplinary construct of black feminism, which embody womanhood, queerness and racism. Her most uplifting and inspiring songs on the album are ‘Crazy, Classic, Life’, ‘Django Jane’, ‘Pynk’, ‘I Like That’ and ‘Americans’.

On ‘Crazy, Classic, Life’, She promotes self-freedom, self-confidence and independence for all women as she sings “I am not America’s nightmare, I am the American Dream”. The intro on this song is an excerpt from the ‘Declaration Of Independence’ which beams a spotlight on the need for equal rights for men and women. With her lyrics, she paints a picture of what it’s like to live a crazy, classic, life in a world where everyone is equal.

‘Django Jane’ is the all-rap track, in which Janelle talks about the power of women and her accomplishments as a woman. In an interview with The Guardian, she described this song as a response to threats being made to her rights as a black, sexually liberated woman.

With lines like: “Black girl magic, y’all can’t stand it. Y’all can’t ban it…..” and “We gave you life, we gave you birth, We gave you God, we gave you Earth” she puts women on the pinnacle of the world. After noting the contribution and importance of women to the world, she poses the unchallengeable rhetorical question “If she the G.O.A.T. now, would anybody doubt it?”. Indeed every woman is the G.O.A.T. 

She uses the lyrics on ‘Pynk’ to declare the supremacy of the color and links it to women using it as a euphemism and simile for the vagina and other parts of the body. Stereotypically in Western culture, boys are associated with blue and girls with pink. Janelle fits in an uncomplicated female empowerment message into this song as she sings: “Cause boy, it’s cool if you got blue We got the pynk“. This line leaves men in the shadows of jealousy as the color they constantly avoid turns out to be the most supreme color. ‘Pynk’ isn’t just a reference to female body parts, but also a reference to everything around us that shares the color pink. With this song, she creates a great argument for Pink as the best color in the world. Many women will feel self-love as they listen to this song and appreciate the beauty in being female.

On ‘I Like That’, she cant be judged for showing interest and being attracted to whoever, or whatever she likes. Her second and third verse contain lyrics that describe a lady who is confident and knows her worth—that’s how every woman should feel! As she sings: “I don’t care what I look like but I feel good. Better than amazing, and better than I could” in her second verse, psychologically, it creates the highest feeling of self-confidence and self-esteem.

‘Americans‘ is not only unshackling for females, but for every American. Janelle mentions the infamous gap in pay between men and women in the line: “Seventy-nine cent to your dollar”.  

In a Trump-era, Janelle Monáe has created an anthem not only for black women, but for every American. In addition to her empowering lyrics on this song, she adds a ‘Not my America’ speech in the bridge that hits home.

An excerpt from the spoken words in the bridge:

“Until women can get equal pay for equal work, this is not my America

Until same-gender loving people can be who they are, this is not my America.”

The chorus serves as an American anthem for the underrepresented and underprivileged.

The most important thing about this album is the message. With the lyrics, she addresses serious issues like sexuality, feminism, politics, and love. Her lyrics are poetic, metaphorical and rhythmic. With her lyrics, she shows strength, passion, pain, love, aggression, confidence and fear. She presents her lyrics like a mediator between  the oppressed and the oppressor. She’s like the Archangel in the Bible, and what Neo represents to the Matrix. For feminists and people of color, this album will elicit strong emotions. Most importantly, every woman should hold on to this album like a bible.

Written by Tommy Monroe (@TommyMonroe_ on Twitter.)