Every Woman Should Listen To Janelle Monáe’s ‘Dirty Computer’ Like An Audio Bible.

Being from a hard-working family and a musically bland city, Janelle Monáe has always highlighted the under-appreciated and the outsider with her lyrics. What sets her apart is the willingness to speak and deliver multilayered analysis of complicated social issues. She isn’t just a feminist who gives powerful speeches, the topic is a resounding feature in her music. Since her mixtape days, she has, sonically, lyrically, and aesthetically articulated a vision for the liberation of women and black People.

On ‘Dirty Computer’ she tackles some interdisciplinary construct of black feminism, which embody womanhood, queerness and racism. Her most uplifting and inspiring songs on the album are ‘Crazy, Classic, Life’, ‘Django Jane’, ‘Pynk’, ‘I Like That’ and ‘Americans’.

On ‘Crazy, Classic, Life’, She promotes self-freedom, self-confidence and independence for all women as she sings “I am not America’s nightmare, I am the American Dream”. The intro on this song is an excerpt from the ‘Declaration Of Independence’ which beams a spotlight on the need for equal rights for men and women. With her lyrics, she paints a picture of what it’s like to live a crazy, classic, life in a world where everyone is equal.

‘Django Jane’ is the all-rap track, in which Janelle talks about the power of women and her accomplishments as a woman. In an interview with The Guardian, she described this song as a response to threats being made to her rights as a black, sexually liberated woman.

With lines like: “Black girl magic, y’all can’t stand it. Y’all can’t ban it…..” and “We gave you life, we gave you birth, We gave you God, we gave you Earth” she puts women on the pinnacle of the world. After noting the contribution and importance of women to the world, she poses the unchallengeable rhetorical question “If she the G.O.A.T. now, would anybody doubt it?”. Indeed every woman is the G.O.A.T. 

She uses the lyrics on ‘Pynk’ to declare the supremacy of the color and links it to women using it as a euphemism and simile for the vagina and other parts of the body. Stereotypically in Western culture, boys are associated with blue and girls with pink. Janelle fits in an uncomplicated female empowerment message into this song as she sings: “Cause boy, it’s cool if you got blue We got the pynk“. This line leaves men in the shadows of jealousy as the color they constantly avoid turns out to be the most supreme color. ‘Pynk’ isn’t just a reference to female body parts, but also a reference to everything around us that shares the color pink. With this song, she creates a great argument for Pink as the best color in the world. Many women will feel self-love as they listen to this song and appreciate the beauty in being female.

On ‘I Like That’, she cant be judged for showing interest and being attracted to whoever, or whatever she likes. Her second and third verse contain lyrics that describe a lady who is confident and knows her worth—that’s how every woman should feel! As she sings: “I don’t care what I look like but I feel good. Better than amazing, and better than I could” in her second verse, psychologically, it creates the highest feeling of self-confidence and self-esteem.

‘Americans‘ is not only unshackling for females, but for every American. Janelle mentions the infamous gap in pay between men and women in the line: “Seventy-nine cent to your dollar”.  

In a Trump-era, Janelle Monáe has created an anthem not only for black women, but for every American. In addition to her empowering lyrics on this song, she adds a ‘Not my America’ speech in the bridge that hits home.

An excerpt from the spoken words in the bridge:

“Until women can get equal pay for equal work, this is not my America

Until same-gender loving people can be who they are, this is not my America.”

The chorus serves as an American anthem for the underrepresented and underprivileged.

The most important thing about this album is the message. With the lyrics, she addresses serious issues like sexuality, feminism, politics, and love. Her lyrics are poetic, metaphorical and rhythmic. With her lyrics, she shows strength, passion, pain, love, aggression, confidence and fear. She presents her lyrics like a mediator between  the oppressed and the oppressor. She’s like the Archangel in the Bible, and what Neo represents to the Matrix. For feminists and people of color, this album will elicit strong emotions. Most importantly, every woman should hold on to this album like a bible.

Written by Tommy Monroe (@TommyMonroe_ on Twitter.)

For Men Like Bill Cosby And R. Kelly, Time Is Up!

After decades of lawsuits, investigations and close calls, Bill Cosby has been found guilty of sexual assault. The comedian was convicted last week for drugging and molesting a Temple University employee, Andrea Constand in 2004.  He faces up to 30 years in prison. Cosby’s image as a wholesome sitcom dad and moral exemplar has been irremediably tarnished in the past few years by dozens of women who accused him of drug-induced sexual assault. However, this conviction will redefine his legacy forever. The ruling was hailed as a turning point in the ‘Me Too’ and ‘Time’s Up’ movements. It is also a vindication for the multitude of women who doubted anyone would ever believe their words against that of the comedian and sitcom star once known as “America’s Dad”. 

A few of his victims exited the courtroom after the verdict was announced, and broke down into tears inside the courthouse. These women, some who testified in court that Cosby sexually assaulted them, had been waiting for that moment for a long time. “Today, this jury has shown what the Me Too movement has been saying: that women are worthy of being believed.”, said Lili Bernard, who accused Cosby of drugging and sexually assaulting her in the 1990’s. The leading voice for the ‘Me Too’ movement in Sacramento, Christine Pelosi described Bill Cosby’s verdict as a boost for the movement. “And to the next Bill Cosby out there, we’re coming for you”, she added.

There are so many men that fit into the description of “the next Bill Cosby”, but for all of them, time is up! Amongst the long list of men who have been accused, it seems the next Bill Cosby will be R. Kelly.  In recent years, as more women have come forward to allege sexual misconduct, protests against R. Kelly have increased. Women of Color (a subcommittee of the Time’s Up organization) issued an open letter in which they condemned R. Kelly and joined the #MuteRKelly campaign on social media. In the letter, they asked multiple companies like Ticketmaster, Spotify, and Apple Music to cut ties with Kelly in the wake of recent allegations of physical and sexual abuse levied against him. The social media campaign #MuteRKelly has sought to stop the playing of his music and the cancellation of his concerts, and Time’s Up has joined that call. The Time’s Up letter addressed to Women Of Color (WOC), started by saying, “We see you. We feel you. Because we are you.”

The Me Too movement, which has destroyed the careers of numerous powerful men after a wave of sexual misconduct allegations, has helped women to be believed rather than attacked when making such accusations, even in cases when victims avoided speaking up for years, as in Cosby’s case. Today, once you’re found guilty of any sexual misbehavior, your contribution to the entertainment, business , political or media industry becomes irrelevant and this tossed into the trash bin. It’s an era of transparency, where more women appear less afraid to call out anyone for abuse and gender inequality in many different forms, and even re-examine accused abusers who thought they had escaped from the iron hands of this social movement.

There are many men like Bill Cosby and R. Kelly who quiver in fear whenever they read the news of one of their kind being convicted or sentenced. However, in the meantime, men like Harvey Weinstein and James Franco have a short time to prepare for the judgement day in court because time is up.

Written by Tommy Monroe.

Coachella 2018: Beyoncé’s Empowering Performance Will Never Be Forgotten.

Finally, Coachella answered the call for wider representation of women of colour! After a year-long wait, Beyoncé blessed the Coachella Valley Music and Arts Festival with her presence on Saturday night. It was a historic night, as her show-stopping performance marks the first time a black woman has headlined the music festival.

Backed by an army of dancers and band members, Beyoncé honored women and herself with a two-hour set of electrifying and empowering performances. From ‘Formation’ to ‘Feeling Myself’ and the feminist anthem ‘Run the world (Girls)’, Queen B received a worldwide standing ovation from the audience. Her performances left women all over the world energized and empowered. She called on the women in the audience, asking if they were strong and smart and if they’d had enough. The souls of many women in the world screamed “YES!” in unison. She continued by commanding women—“Show me” and then enacted ‘I Ain’t Sorry’. During Sorry she emphasized on the line: “suck on my balls” with furious wrath.

She also played a sampling of Malcolm X’s famous quote that starts, “The most disrespected person in America is the black woman” as well as an audio by Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie, in which the Nigerian writer says: “We Should All Be Feminists!” (Yes, we should). Her performance of ‘Run the World (Girls)’ was a powerful salute to feminism where Beyoncé gave a shoutout to every woman.

The reunion of Destinys Child was like a spiritual moment for everyone who viewed it live. The audience at home weren’t left out, as the rousing performance by the musical sisters created a ripple effect that supports the statement, “There is power in female unity”. The effect of Beyoncé’s stimulating act on stage lead to a social media movement for Coachella to be renamed “Beychella”.

Beyoncé is a force in more than one sense of the word. Other than her success as an artists, the most intoxicating thing about Queen B is her empowering persona. While graciously inviting us to bear witness to her historic feat, she also showed a lot of support for women all over the world. She continues to preach about black excellence, female power and the unrelenting possibility of self-belief. Beyoncé has become the embodiment of modern feminism for a society that has been reluctant to claim the word. She is a hero! She is a performer! She is a queen!

Written by Tommy Monroe (TommyMonroe_ on Twitter).